Eragon - Book Image

Our November tweens-teens’ book club selection is Eragon by Christopher Paolini. Eragon is the first book in the Inheritance Cycle book series.  We were persuaded into selecting this book by one of our teens who is extremely fascinated by this series. He has read the entire series several times and suggested we read it as well.  I’ll admit, I’m drawn to books 200 pages or less primarily because I’m a busy mom of five. Nonetheless, I’m willing to give it a try. Additionally, I have heard a lot of wonderful and fascinating things about the book (and series) so why put it off any longer? Let’s read Eragon!

Book Overview: 

Fifteen-year-old Eragon believes that he is merely a poor farm boy—until his destiny as a Dragon Rider is revealed. Gifted with only an ancient sword, a loyal dragon, and sage advice from an old storyteller, Eragon is soon swept into a dangerous tapestry of magic, glory, and power. Now his choices could save—or destroy—the Empire.

Here’s what our teen has to say about the book (spoiler alert):

The book begins with an evil shade named Durza who tries to kidnap a mysterious blue stone from a female elf, but is unsuccessful because the elf uses magic powers to make the stone vanish. Eragon then appears. He is a 15-year-old boy who lives with his uncle, Garrow. While hunting in the forest spine, the stone suddenly appears before him. Soon, the stone (an egg in disguise) hatches and a dragon emerges.

Eragon secretly cares for the dragon and names it Saphira. The evil King Galbatorix soon hears of this and sends two servants (Ra’zac) to find and murder Eragon. Eragon and Saphira are forced to flee their city, as his uncle is attacked and murdered. They are then accompanied by a storyteller named Brom who mentors and  trains Eragon for future battles. They journey through cities, in search of the Ra’zac. They locate them and the battle begins. Unfortunately, the Ra’zac attack Brom, who later dies from the attack. Eragon is then joined by a young arrow specialist named Murtagh.

They continue on to the military city of the Varden, a group who wants to end Galbatorix’s rule. En route, Eragon is captured and later saved by Saphira and Murtagh. They also come across and save a female elf who turns out to be the same elf that sent Saphira to Eragon. They soon reach the Varden and another battle begins. The Varden is attacked by the evil forces led by the Durza, whom in turn is defeated by Eragon. Victorious, yet exhausted and overwhelmed,  Eragon faints after the battle, then awakes, and is told to go to the city of Ellesmera where a whole new adventure begins … and so does the next book in the series, Eldest.

The book is jam-packed with battles upon battles, adventures upon adventures, and a host of mystical characters, places, and figures. This is a great novel for young teens and up who are into fantasy novels. Not only is it action-packed but it has a good inspirational plot to it too. If you’re looking for a good read, check out Eragon.  —Gabe, 14.

Book Series:   Eragon …  Eldest … Brisingr … Inheritance

Eragon

As always, we love to hear your thoughts on books. You may leave us a comment or two about this book, the series, or other books you are currently reading. Happy reading!

By: Dawn Hoff, Book Kids

 

Auggie & Me - Book

A year ago, we selected Wonder by R. J. Palacio as our tweens-teens’ book for October, in support of National Bullying Prevention Month. This year, we’ve decided to continue in our efforts to show support and spread awareness through books. We’ve chosen Auggie & Me: Three Wonder Stories by the same author, as our October book club selection.

While Wonder focuses primarily on Auggie, Auggie & Me focuses more on Julian, Christopher, and Charlotte. It contains three short stories (one for each character) that offer greater insights into their thoughts and actions and gives us a better understanding of their interactions with and reactions toward Auggie. It is a great read with a great anti-bullying message. Although this book is not a sequel to Wonder, it does give us a better understanding of each character’s life and behavior. Having said that, we recommend that you read Wonder first, if you haven’t already done so.

As always, we love hearing your thoughts on books. You may leave a comment or two about this book or other books you are reading. Happy Fall! Happy Reading!

Book Overview: These stories are an extra peek at Auggie before he started at Beecher Prep and during his first year there. Readers get to see him through the eyes of Julian, the bully; Christopher, Auggie’s oldest friend; and Charlotte, Auggie’s new friend at school. Together, these three stories are a treasure for readers who don’t want to leave Auggie behind when they finish Wonder.

By Dawn Hoff, Book Kids

National Poetry Month

“Oh, for a nook and a storybook. With tales both new and old. For a jolly good book whereon to look. Is better to me than gold.”— Old English Song.

April is National Poetry Month. In honor and celebration of the largest literary celebration in the world, I’ve compiled a list of 26 of our favorite poems about books, of course books. These inspiring poems will take you into the fascinating world of books, only to have you return with a book or two inside you. They are simple, short, and fun for readers of all ages. All you have to do is dive through the pages. If, even still,  you’re unsure of what’s in store; rest assured, they’ll leave you yearning for more. Take a look!

I Opened a Book
By Julia Donaldson

I opened a book and in I strode.
Now nobody can find me.
I’ve left my chair, my house, my road,
My town and my world behind me.

I’m wearing the cloak, I’ve slipped on the ring,
I’ve swallowed the magic potion.
I’ve fought with a dragon, dined with a king
And dived in a bottomless ocean.

I opened a book and made some friends.
I shared their tears and laughter
And followed their road with its bumps and bends
To the happily ever after.

I finished my book and out I came.
The cloak can no longer hide me.
My chair and my house are just the same,
But I have a book inside me.

There is no Frigate like a Book
By Emily Dickinson

There is no Frigate like a Book
To take us Lands away
Nor any Coursers like a Page
Of prancing Poetry.
This Traverse may the poorest take
Without oppress of Toll;
How frugal is the Chariot
That bears the Human Soul!

Read to Me
By Jane Yolen

Read to me riddles and read to me rhymes
Read to me stories of magical times
Read to me tales about castles and kings
Read to me stories of fabulous things
Read to me pirates and read to me knights
Read to me dragons and dragon-book fights
Read to me spaceships and cowboys and then
When you are finished- please read them again.

Notes on the Art of Poetry
By Dylan Thomas

I could never have dreamt that there were such goings-on
in the world between the covers of books,
such sandstorms and ice blasts of words,
such staggering peace, such enormous laughter,
such and so many blinding bright lights,
splashing all over the pages
in a million bits and pieces
all of which were words, words, words,
and each of which were alive forever
in its own delight and glory and oddity and light.

Adventure
By Anonymous

Here’s an adventure! What awaits
Beyond these closed, mysterious gates?
Whom shall I meet, where shall I go?
Beyond the lovely land I know?
Above the sky, across the sea?
What shall I learn and feel and be?
Open, strange doors, to good or ill!
I hold my breath a moment still
Before the magic of your look.
What shall you do to me, O book?

Open A Book,
By Jane Baskwill

Open a book
And you will find
People and places of every kind;
Open a book
And you can be
Anything that you want to be;
Open a book
And you can share
Wondrous worlds you find in there;
Open a book
And I will too
You read to me
And I’ll read to you.

I Met a Dragon Face to Face
By Jack Prelutsky

I met a dragon face to face
the year when I was ten,
I took a trip to outer space,
I braved a pirate’s den,
I wrestled with a wicked troll,
and fought a great white shark,
I trailed a rabbit down a hole,
I hunted for a snark.

I stowed aboard a submarine,
I opened magic doors,
I traveled in a time machine,
and searched for dinosaurs,
I climbed atop a giant’s head,
I found a pot of gold,
I did all this in books I read
when I was ten years old.

Books to the Ceiling
By Arnold Lobel

Books to the ceiling,
Books to the sky,
My piles of books are a mile high.
How I love them!
How I need them!
I’ll have a long beard by the time I read them.

Good Books
By Edgar Guest

Good books are friendly things to own.
If you are busy they will wait.
They will not call you on the phone
Or wake you if the hour is late.
They stand together row by row,
Upon the low shelf or the high.
But if you’re lonesome this you know:
You have a friend or two nearby.

The fellowship of books is real.
They’re never noisy when you’re still.
They won’t disturb you at your meal.
They’ll comfort you when you are ill.
The lonesome hours they’ll always share.
When slighted they will not complain.
And though for them you’ve ceased to care
Your constant friends they’ll still remain.

Good books your faults will never see
Or tell about them round the town.
If you would have their company
You merely have to take them down.
They’ll help you pass the time away,
They’ll counsel give if that you need.
He has true friends for night and day
Who has a few good books to read.

There is a Land
By Leland B. Jacobs

There is a land –
A marvelous land –
Where trolls and giants dwell;
Where witches
With their bitter brew
Can cast a magic spell;
Where mermaids sing,
Where carpets fly,
Where, in the midst of night,
Brownies dance
To cricket tunes;
And ghosts, all shivery and white,
Prowl and moan.
There is a land
Of magic folks and deeds,
And anyone
Can visit there
Who reads and reads and reads.

Adventures with Books
By Velda Blumhagen

Books are ships that sail the seas
To lands of snow or jungle trees.
And I’m the captain bold and free
Who will decide which place we’ll see.
Come, let us sail the magic ship.

Books are trains in many lands,
Crossing hills or desert sands.
And I’m the engineer who guides
The train on its exciting rides.
Come, let us ride the magic train.

Books are zoos that make a home
For birds and beasts not free to roam.
And I’m the keeper of the zoo,
I choose the things to show to you.
Come, let us visit in a zoo.

Books are gardens, fairies, elves,
Cowboys, and people like ourselves.
And I can find with one good look
Just what I want inside a book.
Come, let us read! For reading’s fun!

The Reading Mother
By Strickland Gillilan

I had a mother who read to me
Sagas of pirates who scoured the sea,
Cutlasses clenched in their yellow teeth,
“Blackbirds” stowed in the hold beneath.

I had a Mother who read me lays
Of ancient and gallant and golden days;
Stories of Marmion and Ivanhoe,
Which every boy has a right to know.

I had a Mother who read me tales
Of Gelert the hound of the hills of Wales,
True to his trust till his tragic death,
Faithfulness blent with his final breath.

I had a Mother who read me the things
That wholesome life to the boy heart brings –
Stories that stir with an upward touch,
Oh, that each mother of boys were such!

You may have tangible wealth untold;
Caskets of jewels and coffers of gold.
Richer than I you can never be –
I had a Mother who read to me.

What is a Book?
By Lora Daunt

A book is pages, pictures and words
A book is animals, people and birds
A book is stories of queens and kings
Poems and songs-so many things!
Curled in a corner where I can hide
With a book I can journey far and wide
Though it’s only paper from end to end
A book is a very special friend.

Books
By Helen H. Moore

If you read a few, then you’ll know it’s true:
Books are good for you!
Chefs read cook books,
Pirates? “Hook” books!
Little kids read lift-and-look books!
We read books of poems and prose –
Some of these and some of those.
Read some too, and you’ll agree,
Books are good for you and me!

Pass The Poems, Please
By Jane Baskwill

Pass the poem please
Pile them on my plate
Put them right in front of me
For I can hardly wait
To take each tangy word
To try each tasty rhyme
And when I’ve tried them once or twice
I’ll try them one more time:
So pass the poems please
They just won’t leave my head
I have to have more poems
Before I go to bed.

Reading in Bed
By Helen H. Moore

Oh, what could be better
Than reading in bed,
Or thinking about
All the books that you’ve read?

With someone who loves you,
A father, a mother,
A doll, or a pet,
Or a sister or brother,

A grandma, a grandpa,
An uncle, an aunt –
(Can you think of anything better?
I can’t!)

While outside the sky
Is all twinkling with light,
From stars that shine down
As we sleep through the night.

Oh, what could be better
Than sleepin in bed,
When the books that you love
Fill the dreams in your head?

Happy Chimney Corner Days
By Robert Louis Stevenson

Summer fading, winter comes –
Frosty mornings, tingling thumbs
Window robins, winter rooks,
And the picture story-books.

Water now is turned to stone
Nurse and I can walk upon;
Still we find the flowing brooks
In the picture story-books.

All the pretty things put by,
Wait upon the children’s eye,
Sheep and shepherds, trees and crooks,
In the picture story-books.

We may see how all things are,
Seas and cities, near and far,
And the flying fairies’ looks,
In the picture story-books.

How am I to sing your praise,
Happy chimney-corner days,
Sitting safe in nursery nooks,
Reading picture story-books

Books are for Looks
By Isabelle Spooner

Books are for looks; a look for a tale
Of possible a lion, a tiger, or a whale.

A look for adventure, exciting, intense
With mystery unfolding and growing suspense.

A look for a fact, to inform or relate,
A picture, a poem, or a word to locate.

You never can tell when you start to look
What interesting things may come in a book!

I Like a Book
By M. Lucille Ford

I like a book. It tells me things
Of ancient peoples and their kings
And what they used to do;
Of giants in some far-off land
And things I hardly understand,
Both make-believe and true.

I like books. It’s fun to see
How interesting they can be –
As people are. And so
I try to treat them like a friend
And many pleasant hours spend
In learning what they know.

Books
By Solveig Paulson Russell

Books are friends who take you far
Wherever you would go,
From torrid lands and jungle ways
To northern fields of snow.

Books bring us gifts from long ago
And hints of future days,
And lead the mind refreshingly
On unfamiliar ways.

Books are the chests of pirate gold
Where wealth in stories lies
As varied as the clouds that blow
Across November skies.

Reading Books
By Vivian G. Gouled

I like to read all kinds of books
To entertain myself,
And so I’m glad when I can take
A book down from the shelf.

I like the picture books of planes,
Of flowers, birds, and ships
From which I can imagine that
I’m taking wonder trips.

I like the books with stories in
And also books of rhymes;
I often try to learn a few
And say them lots of times.

I like to read all kinds of books
I find upon the shelf –
Particularly now that I
Can read all by myself!

The Land of Story-books
By Robert Louis Stevenson

At evening when the lamp is lit,
Around the fire my parents sit;
They sit at home and talk and sing,
And do not play at anything.

Now, with my little gun, I crawl
All in the dark along the wall,
And follow round the forest track
Away behind the sofa back.

There, in the night, where none can spy,
All in my hunter’s camp I lie,
And play at books that I have read
Till it is time to go to bed.

These are the hills, these are the woods,
These are my starry solitudes;
And there the river by whose brink
The roaring lions come to drink.

I see the others far away
As if in firelit camp they lay,
And I, like to an Indian scout,
Around their party prowled about.

So, when my nurse comes in for me,
Home I return across the sea,
And go to bed with backward looks
At my dear land of Story-books.

Magic Keys
By Leah Gibbs Knobbe

Would you like to travel far
From the place where now you are?
Read a book!

Would you nature’s secrets know,
How her children live and grow?
Read a book!

Is it adventure that you crave,
On land or on ocean wave?
Read a book!

Would you like to talk with kings?
Or to fly with Lindbergh’s wings?
Read a book!

Would you look on days gone by?
Know scientific reasons why?
Read a book!

The world before you will unfold,
For a magic key you hold
In a book!

Storyboat
By Bobbi Katz

It’s time to read a story,
so climb aboard with me,
and we can sail a storyboat
across a magic sea.
We can visit jungles
or rub noses with a bear.
We can visit anyplace
and sail to anywhere.
We can learn a lot of stuff
from sailin storyboats –
like how to ride on elephants
or how skinks got striped coats.
We can meet a bunch of kids
that we’ll be glad to know,
and when the summer gets too hot,
we’ll sail in seas of snow!

When Mother Reads Aloud
By Anonymous

When Mother reads aloud, the past
Seems real as every day;
I hear the tramp of armies vast,
I see the spears and lances cast,
I join the thrilling fray;
Brave knights and ladies fair and proud
I meet when Mother reads aloud.

When Mother reads aloud, far lands
Seem very near and true;
I cross the desert’s gleaming sands,
Or hunt the jungle’s prowling bands,
Or sail the ocean blue.
Far heights, whose peaks the cold mists shroud,
I scale, when Mother reads aloud.

When Mother reads aloud, I long
For noble deeds to do –
To help the right, redress the wrong;
It seems so easy to be strong,
So simple to be true.
Oh, thick and fast the visions crowd
My eyes, when Mother reads aloud.

When You Can Read
By Bobbi Katz

When you can read, then you can go
from Kalamazoo to Idaho –
Or read directions that explain
just how to build a model plane –
Or bake a cake or cook a stew –
The words will tell you what to do!
When you can read, then you can play
a brand new game the proper way –
Or get a letter from a friend
and read it . . . to the very end!

By Dawn Hoff, Book Kids

You might also want to check out: 8 Inspirational Poems About Books and Reading

 

 

I Am Malala

“One child, one teacher, one book, one pen can change the world.”  -Malala Yousafzai

We’ve been glued to Malala’s story even before the publication of her book, I Am Malala: How One Girl Stood Up for Education and Changed the World (Young Readers Edition). We’ve followed her story from her tragic near-death experience, to her remarkable recovery, to her heroic efforts and stance for education, to her notable honor as the youngest ever to win the Nobel Peace Prize. We’ve been greatly inspired by her story of bravery, courage, and compassion, so much so that we’ve decided to select her book as our tweens/ teens’ book club pick for March. Our selection of this book was also influenced by the fact that March is Women’s History Month.

While most of our book kids and adults have read it, some haven’t. In any case, we are looking forward to having you join us in reading or rereading the story of and by a little girl with a BIG vision to change the world. As always, we love to hear your thoughts on books. Please leave a comment or two about this book or other books you are currently reading. Happy Reading!

About This Book: Malala Yousafzai was only ten years old when the Taliban took control of her region. They said music was a crime. They said women weren’t allowed to go to the market. They said girls couldn’t go to school.

Raised in a once-peaceful area of Pakistan transformed by terrorism, Malala was taught to stand up for what she believes. So she fought for her right to be educated. And on October 9, 2012, she nearly lost her life for her cause: She was shot point-blank while riding the bus on her way home from school.

No one expected her to survive

Now Malala is an international symbol of peaceful protest and the youngest ever Nobel Peace Prize winner. In this Young Readers Edition of her bestselling memoir, which has been reimagined specifically for a younger audience and includes exclusive photos and material, we hear firsthand the remarkable story of a girl who knew from a young age that she wanted to change the world — and did.

Malala’s powerful story will open your eyes to another world and will make you believe in hope, truth, miracles and the possibility that one person — one young person — can inspire change in her community and beyond.

About Malala: Malala Yousafzai was born in 1997 in the Swat Valley of Pakistan. In her short lifetime, she has already experienced devastating changes in her country, which has been transformed from a once peaceful land to a hotbed of terrorism. Malala, who now lives in Birmingham, England, says she has been given a second life, which she intends to devote to the good of the people and her belief that all girls everywhere deserve an education. The fund she started can be found at http://www.MalalaFund.org.

About Malala’s Fund: visit >> http://www.MalalaFund.org.

By: Dawn Hoff, Book Kids

The New Big Book of U.S. Presidents

In honor of Presidents’ Day we are highlighting The New Big Book of U.S. Presidents by Marc Frey and Todd Davis for ages 8-12 years. This is the ONE children’s book of U.S. presidents my kids swear by. I bought this book the moment my elementary schooler insisted that he was going to be the “next” U.S. president. I knew he was too young to be the next president, but I wasn’t about to pass up the opportunity to feast on his new-found fascination. Let’s just say this book hasn’t been laid to rest since.  Furthermore, now that the other kids have followed suit, this has become one of the most frequently read books in our home. All our kids are intrigued by it. Here’s why:

1. The book offers fascinating facts. It is not just a “George Washington was the first U.S. president” kind of book. Kids need to know more than just that. It offers a lot more meat about each president’s personal and political life, going even further to include key historical events and achievements surrounding their presidencies, without being lengthy, redundant, or boring. 

2. The book is easy to read and comprehend. I love when a book explains its content to its kid readers so well to the point where adults have to do very little to no reiterating. Indeed, the book is jam-packed with lots of detailed facts and history, but don’t be overwhelmed; they are presented in the simplest, kid-friendly language that kids can easily grasp. Seriously.

3. The book includes a historical timeline. This timeline covers key historical topics that include arts, literature, politics, religion, science, education, etc., you name it. Again, don’t be overwhelmed. They are outlined in the simplest, chronological fashion that is a no brainer for your little reader to absorb.

4. The book has great illustrations. You can never go wrong with great illustrations, especially when your readers are primarily kids. These photos not only serve as a great supplement to the text, they add such incredible details to the point where without the text, they can almost easily stand alone. My kids particularly love associating each president’s name to his face. They also love in inclusion of old historical pictures of the events and persons highlighted in the text.

5. The book has a glossary of key terms. I particularly love a book that includes a glossary primarily because it helps kids review key terms mentioned in the book. It also serves as a summary of what is covered in the text. I see these as a great opportunity for a quick review or quiz to see how much information they actually retain from the reading.

Overall, this book is both educational and entertaining; there are both hilarious and serious aspects to it. This is a book the entire family will enjoy reading, while learning about presidential facts and figures. Let us know what you think. Until then, Happy Presidents’ Day! Happy Reading!   

By: Dawn Hoff, Book Kids

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kids Books - MLKThere are many ways we can honor the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. One way is through books. Books can be a powerful tool in educating kids on Dr. King’s contributions to humanity, particularly human rights and civil rights. Civil rights can be a rather complicated topic for young kids to tackle and absorb; that’s why we’ve selected these 10 books. 

We’ve chosen them primarily because they cover everything from Dr. King’s childhood to his adult years in the simplest ways kids can easily comprehend. They provide greater insight and understanding of who Dr. King was and what he stood for. We would love to hear from you. Tell us about some of the children’s books you use to educate, celebrate, or honor Dr. King’s legacy. Until then, dive in and let’s reflect on the life and legacy of one of America’s greatest human rights and civil rights leaders of all times. 

MLK JR7Meet Martin Luther King Jr.  by Johnny Ray Moore (Author),  Amy Wummer (Illustrator)

Book Synopsis: This title is suitable for ages 4 to 8 years. Beginning with King’s childhood and following his life through his ” I Have a Dream Speech” and subsequent death, this book reveals (in age-appropriate language) how King ended segregation in America and influenced the way we live our lives today. (Ages 4-8 years)

MLK JR2The Story of Martin Luther King Jr.  by Johnny Ray Moore (Author),  Amy Wummer (Illustrator)

Book Synopsis: This little board book uses only approximately 200 words to tell about the life of Martin Luther King, Jr. and to explain, in simple terms, how he ended segregation in America. (Ages 2 and up)

A Picture Book of MLK JrA Picture Book of Martin Luther King, Jr.  by David A. Adler (Author), Robert Casilla (Illustrator)

Book Synopsis: “Martin Luther King, Jr. was one of America’s great leaders. He was a powerful speaker, and he spoke out against laws which kept black people out of many schools and jobs. He led protests and marches demanding fair laws for all people.” Dr. King dreamed of a world free of hate, prejudice and violence. This book is about the life and ideals of an outstanding man. (Ages 6-8 years)

The MLK JR StoryThe Martin Luther King, Jr. Story: The Boy Who Broke Barriers with Faith (Great Hero Series) by T. S. Lee (Author)

Book Synopsis: The Passionate life of Martin Luther King Jr. A leader of unfailing faith who spent his life fighting for civil rights. From a small-town nobody as a boy to the “Father” of all black people around the world, black civil rights activist Martin Luther King changed the world through his faith in man and an endless passion for peace and equality. (Ages 9 and up)

MLK JR8Celebrate Martin Luther King, Jr. Day with Mrs. Park’s Class (Stories to Celebrate) by Alma Flor Ada & F Isabel Campoy (Authors)

Book Synopsis: The students in Mrs. Park’s class prepare to celebrate Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Day by thinking about the values he taught. Contains an informative section on Martin Luther King, Jr. (Ages 5 and up)

MLK JR12My First Biography: Martin Luther King, Jr. by Marion Dane Bauer (Author), Jamie Smith (Illustrator) 

Book Synopsis: Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was a great man. His words changed the way people thought, and his actions spurred them on to change the world. With simple, lyrical text and bold, kid-friendly illustrations, this book introduces Dr. King to the youngest readers and inspires them to change the world. (Ages 4-8 years)

MLK JR6My Daddy, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. by Martin Luther King, III (Author), AG Ford (Illustrator)

Book Synopsis: What was it like growing up as a son of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.? This picture book memoir provides insight into one of history’s most fascinating families and into a special bond between father and son. “I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.” Martin Luther King III was one of those four little children mentioned in Martin Luther King’s groundbreaking “I Have a Dream” speech. In this memoir, Martin Luther King Jr.’s son gives an intimate look at the man and the father behind the civil rights leader. Mr. King’s remembrances show both his warm, loving family and a momentous time in American history. (Ages 4-8 years)

MLK JR5 I Have a Dream by Martin Luther King, Jr. (Author), Kadir Nelson (Illustrator) 

Book Synopsis: From Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s daughter, Dr. Bernice A. King: “My father’s dream continues to live on from generation to generation, and this beautiful and powerful illustrated edition of his world-changing “I Have a Dream” speech brings his inspiring message of freedom, equality, and peace to the youngest among us—those who will one day carry his dream forward for everyone.”

On August 28, 1963, on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial during the March on Washington, Martin Luther King gave one of the most powerful and memorable speeches in our nation’s history. His words, paired with Caldecott Honor winner Kadir Nelson’s magnificent paintings, make for a picture book certain to be treasured by children and adults alike. The themes of equality and freedom for all are not only relevant today, 50 years later, but also provide young readers with an important introduction to our nation’s past. Included with the book is an audio CD of the speech. (Ages 5 and up)

My Brother Martin3My Brother Martin: A Sister Remembers Growing Up with the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. by Christine King Farris (Author), Chris Soentpiet (Illustrator)

Book Synopsis: “Mother Dear, one day I’m going to turn this world upside down.” Long before he became a world-famous dreamer, Martin Luther King Jr. was a little boy who played jokes and practiced the piano and made friends without considering race. But growing up in the segregated south of the 1930s taught young Martin a bitter lesson—little white children and little black children were not to play with one another. Martin decided then and there that something had to be done. And so he began the journey that would change the course of American history. (Ages 6-11 years)

By: Dawn Hoff, Book Kids

Wonder2

“I wish every day could be Halloween. We could all wear masks all the time. Then we could walk around and get to know each other before we got to see what we looked like under the masks.” ~R. J. Palacio (Wonder)

It is no wonder that we are choosing Wonder by R. J. Palacio (Recommended for ages 9-12) as our tween/teens’ book pick for October, in honor of National Bullying Prevention Month.

“August Pullman was born with a facial difference that, up until now, has prevented him from going to a mainstream school. Starting 5th grade at Beecher Prep, he wants nothing more than to be treated as an ordinary kid—but his new classmates can’t get past Auggie’s extraordinary face.” Or can they? This book is a must-read that will leave you in awe and wonder!  Get you a copy and dive in!

Feel free to leave a comment or two below, and you could win a free copy. Share your views and thoughts about this book for a chance to win your free copy. A winner will be randomly selected from the comment section at the end of October. Let’s dive into some books!

* Children, please seek parental permission and guidance before commenting on all book club books. All our book picks are found on amazon. You may also check your local bookstores or libraries.

Dawn Hoff, Book Kids